zenpundit.com » law enforcement

Archive for the ‘law enforcement’ Category

Poetry is dead vs the death penalty for poetry?

Monday, November 30th, 2015

[ by Charles Cameron — current affairs, target practice, and incarnation ]
.

Ah.

Palestinian poet and painter Ahraf Fayadh is currently under a death sentence in Saudi Arabia.

It appears important to recognize the full human significance of one’s target

**

Flaubert apparently pronounced poetry dead in his posthumous opus, Bouvard et Pécuchet, 1881, and even Newsweek had noted the fact — “filed under: News” — by 2003. Neither Flaubert nor Newsweek, however, was reckoning on the long-standing Arab enthusiasm for poetry, nicely illustrated to this day by the seriousness with which the authorities treat their poets.

**

Oh..

and while we’re on the subject of targeting..

it may also be wise to recognize the full divine significance of one’s target.

Norway: what else?

Saturday, September 12th, 2015

[ by Charles Cameron — ointment and fly, and how one thing leads to another ]
.

Reading..

and..

in rapid succession on my twitterfeed the other day, I’ve been thinking of my Norwegian friend, the artist Jan Valentin Saether..

**

What else?

Ah yes, Anders Behring Breivik, the black dot in the white swoosh of the Tai-Chih symbol — and I’m beginning to get the impression the ripples are spreading:

  • The Guardian, Why are anti-immigration parties so strong in the Nordic states?
  • August: Vocativ, E.U.’s Right-Wing Parties Surging Thanks To Migrant Crisis
  • September: NY Times, Migrant Influx May Give Europe’s Far Right a Lift
  • Curious fact:

    Even in 2011, the year of the Utøya terror attacks, the Norwegian police only fired one shot.

    Hand grenades: a two way street

    Thursday, August 13th, 2015

    [ by Charles Cameron — toys as weapons, weapons as toys, appearances, can be deceptive, ethnicities too ]
    .

    Before there were the realities we now know as “virtual reality” and “real life” there were the two known as “real” and “pretend” or “make-believe”.

    Confusing pretend for real can be harrowing enough, as we saw this morning:

    but the reverse has even more dire potential:

    **

    For the record, toy grenades are a a regular feature of the news these days, see for instance:

  • 26 June 2015, Bomb disposal team called to toy grenade in Coatbridge
  • 19 Octpober 2014, Toy grenade puts Newport News neighborhood on alert<
  • Get your Toy Grenades Battery Operated for Pretend Play on Amazon:

    Toy Grenades

  • Pull the grenade pin, press bar and throw!
  • Estimated Delivery Date: Aug. 14 – 19 when you choose Expedited at checkout

  • **

    Watch out, Staten Island:

    But then again..

    when is an assault rifle not an assault rifle?

    and come to that,

    when is a paintball more than a paintball — when is it a weapon?

    and when is the reason not just a paintball, but a scarf?

    — and if that’s not enough, is skin color a difference that makes a difference?

    Ah yes.

    Target and Walmart — another nice pairing that gives that last tweet just a touch of extra impact!

    Opposites attract?

    Wednesday, August 12th, 2015

    [ by Charles Cameron — stunned ]
    .

    This has got to be one of the strangest DoubleQuotes, referencing one of the strangest DoubleLives, that I have ever seen:

    **

    Oh, and are they opposites?

    Turning analytic bifocals on the Islamic State’s Irregulars

    Tuesday, December 30th, 2014

    [ by Charles Cameron — IS / Daesh focus is not on the question of derangement but of repentance – Dabiq #6, Aquinas, adaequatio ]
    .

    Lindt police
    Lindt cafe worker escapes Man Haron Monis hostage situation, Sydney – credit Jason Reed, Reuters

    **

    It’s interesting to compare how we think about those like Man Haron Monis on the cusp between derangement, criminality, terrorism and jihad, and how IS views them.

    JM Berger remarks of those he classifies as The Islamic State’s Irregulars:

    in a number of these cases, it’s unclear whether the attacks were inspired by the Islamic State and its extremist ideology, or whether IS provided a convenient excuse for violence that was already brewing in the hearts of the perpetrators.

    while his subtitle asks:

    What should we do with lone-wolf attackers who are mentally unstable or deranged? Are they terrorists, too?

    **

    Berger, among our most discerning analysts and co-author with Jessica Stern of the keenly awaited book, ISIS: The State of Terror, describes Monis as:

    a Shiite Muslim born in Iran who had emigrated to Australia. He had been charged in 2013 as an accessory to murder and faced dozens of sexual assault charges related to his “spiritual healing” practice. His own lawyer described him as “unhinged.”

    Clearly, the waves of influence running amok in Monis’ head are nowhere near as simply as our routine categorizations – that he was IS, or simply a terrorist, a mental case, a criminal, a murderer perhaps – would like to suggest. Our best inquiry is into his mental state, his psychological “drivers” – how we can understand him, with easy categorization the sound-bite version providing closure.

    **

    The Islamic State views him differently. As described in the sixth issue of their magazine, Dabiq, he is clearly a religious hero, specifically a martyr:

    It didn’t take much; he got hold of a gun and stormed a café taking everyone inside hostage. Yet in doing so, he prompted mass panic, brought terror to the entire nation, and triggered an evacuation of parts of Sydney’s central business district. The blessings in his efforts were apparent from the very outset.

    Dabiq then paints western media diagnoses made against him as slurs:

    Then, as the situation developed and his identity was revealed, we saw a predictable response from the international media. They immediately began searching for anything negative that they could use against him, and subsequently began reporting numerous allegations made against him in an attempt to smear his character and, by extension, the noble cause that he was fighting for – the cause of Allah (ta’?l?).

    And then something interesting occurs. Dabiq, half-admitting the accuracy of some of those slurs, defends him not by denying their accuracy but by framing them in the context of repentance and divine mercy:

    The fact is, however, that any allegations leveled against a person concerning their past are irrelevant as long as they hope for Allah’s mercy and sincerely repent from any previous misguidance.

    This is so with one who embraces Islam and thereby has his past history of shirk and transgression completely erased – as was even the case with many Sahabah. So how much more so in the case of one who followed up his repentance by fighting and being killed in the path of Allah, knowing the Prophet (sallallahu ‘alayhi wa sallam) declared that such a person would be forgiven the moment his blood is first spilled.

    **

    “He was deranged, violent, driven, and IS became the hook on which he hanged himself” – or “His sacrificial death absolved him from all flaws and sins”. The contrast is instructive.

    It seems best for us to to wear secular / sacred bifocals in our analyses. But how does the analyst gain that faculty which EF schumacher, Thomas Aquinas and Augustine call adaequatio rei et intellectus

    according to which to each plane of reality there corresponds an instrument of knowledge adequate to the task of knowing that particular level of reality

    ??


    Switch to our mobile site