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Sunday shame!

Monday, November 5th, 2018

[ by Charles Cameron — my father fought and died for an end to this, well over fifty years ago, and now this.. ]
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For the record —

— that little yellow star resurfacing on social media in 2018 USA, for shame.

**

Sources:

  • BuzzFeed, A Reporter Got An Anti-Semitic Death Threat From A Trump Supporter
  • Twitter, Binyamin Appelbaum
  • **

    For shame?

    It’s all too easy to moralize. Happily for me, I was born on the “better angels” side of WWII.

    Sunday surprise — jeeps with souls, telepathic cars

    Sunday, October 28th, 2018

    [ by Charles Cameron — are the shows on TV the medium’s waking life, and advertisements its dreams? ]
    .

    My mom was Freedom, and my dad, Adventure. They baptized me in mud and christened me on rock, so I got tougher, they fostered a love of learning so I got smarter, taught me to appreciate the finer things in life sp I became more civilized and refined. Thank you, Freedom and Adventure, for giving me this rugged, civilized, wandering soul..

    **

    .. we’re helping to give cars the power to read your mind from anywhere ..

    **

    A Jeep is machinery, an engine, a tool, a prosthetic — but now it has a soul — how was that achieved. Is it a shiny new species of Golem? Did someone breathe the Name into it? And the car that Dell is teaching to read minds — does it too have a soul?

    I appreciate Dell, am now on my second or fifth Dell laptop, and I once rolled a Jeep over, and myself and senior son escaped with barely a scratch between the pair of us. It was one of those California days, the road slick with first rain, and I wrote 150 pages for DC charitable NGO as court-required penance.

    My intent is not to knock (diss) Dell or Jeep — in fact I appreciate their products and admire the skills displayed by their advertising agencies — but simply to point up the quasi-spiritual ways in which these ads present cars. There are good insights into humanity, in fact, to be found in these depictions of machines.

    Here’s to (human) real-life civilized, wandering souls!

    Sunday surprise, Leon Boellmann

    Sunday, October 21st, 2018

    [ by Charles Cameron — a magnificent fifteen minutes of organ, brass ensemble and drums by a 19th century French Romantic composer I encountered just this week ]
    .

    Superb —

    and it has taken me a month shy of seventy-five years to discover this masterpiece.

    Enjoy!

    And if I enjoin you to enjoy, please take the time and enjoy! — I’ll confess I’ve been binge-listening..

    Sunday surprise, the wind bloweth

    Monday, September 17th, 2018

    [ by Charles Cameron — when inspiration is in the air — Sister Rosetta and Kathleen Raine ]
    .

    Two very different artworks, each beginning with an attempt to express where inspiration comes from.

    My friend and sometime mentor Kathleen Raine‘s great poem, Invocation:

    Invocation:

    There is a poem on the way,
    There is a poem all round me,
    The poem is in the near future,
    The poem is in the upper air
    Above the foggy atmosphere
    It hovers, a spirit
    That I would make incarnate.
    Let my body sweat
    Let snakes torment my breast
    My eyes be blind, ears deaf, hands distraught
    Mouth parched, uterus cut out,
    Belly slashed, back lashed,
    Tongue slivered into thongs of leather
    Rain stones inserted in my breasts,
    Head severed,

    If only the lips may speak,
    If only the god will come.

    **

    Compare the early gospeller Sister Rosetta Tharpe‘s Music in the air:

    **

    Sister Rosetta sings, Up above my head / music in the air, and Kathleen Raine elaborates, “There is a poem all round me, / The poem is in the near future, / The poem is in the upper air”.. I could go on to describe how Kathleen’s prayer then builds, in rhythm, rhyme, and agony, her description of what she would offer in sacrifice if the divine wind should answer her prayer with a poem — the poem we are in fact reading — and there’s surely no need for me to express further the joy that Sister Rosetta’s song itself invokes and embodies

    But I would like to note that commonality between them — of the inspiration waiting, for Kathleen “in the upper air”, for Rosetta, “above my head” — and to say that “upper” and “above” here indicate a metaphorical rather than a physical dimension..

    **

    And “The wind bloweth where it listeth, and thou hearest the sound thereof, but canst not tell whence it cometh, and whither it goeth: so is every one that is born of the Spirit.”

    In this verse, the word for wind and spirit, pneuma, is also the word for breath — wind outside as part of the weather, inner wind as breath, and inspiration (literally, in-breathing) as what the inner wind carries with it — while the verb form, blow, is also related.

    Thus we may read the verse as meaning “wind blows where it wants, and nobody can tell where it comes from, or where it will go next” — or “breath breathes of its own accord, and no-one knows where it comes from or when it will cease” — or “inspiration cannot be forced, it touches down and takes off at its own pleasure, not at our command”..

    Like grace, it floats in possibility space, alighting at will, ever spontaneous, unmerited, never to be predicted.. Fortunate Sister Rosetta, fortunate Kathleen to have been visited.

    Sunday surprise 2, for Sally B, poetic afflatus

    Monday, September 3rd, 2018

    [ by Charles Cameron — a romantic attribute of poets, close to the holy spirit ]
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    Poetic afflatus is the term for a private wind of inspiration which follows a poet around — on fortunate days. That photo of Donald Hall which Sally Benzon so much admired, I believe illustrates the afflatus — Hall has allowed his hair to stray wherever the whim of wind may take it, while the urbane Obama has curated his to stay close to the skull in all weathers — a remarkable juncture of opposites.

    Here, then, for Sally B and all, is the only example I know of, presenting that private wind in a motion picture — here surrounding the person of Richard Burton, ruffling his hair and scarf while all else in the room is still — in an unforgettable clip from Christian Marquand‘s 1968 film Candy, itself a loose (not to say libertine) update of Candide:


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