Heavy breathing on the line: The wheel of the mandala

  1. Whoever thinks himself to be growing in power more rapidly both in quality and quantity (than his enemy), and the reverse of his enemy, may neglect his enemy’s progress for the time.
  2. If any two kings hostile to each other find the time of achieving the results of their respective works to be equal, they shall make peace with each other.
  3. No king shall keep that form of policy, which causes him the loss of profit from his own works, but which entails no such loss on the enemy; for it is deterioration.
  4. Whoever thinks that in the course of time his loss will be less than his acquisition as contrasted with that of his enemy, may neglect his temporary deterioration.
  5. If any two kings hostile to each other and deteriorating, expect to acquire equal amount of wealth in equal time, they shall make peace with each other.

More:

A king who is situated between two powerful kings shall seek protection from

  • The stronger of the two
  • Or from one of them on whom he can rely
  • Or he may make peace with both of them on equal terms

Then he may begin to set one of them against the other by telling each that the other is a tyrant causing utter ruin to himself, and thus cause dissension between them.

When they are divided, he may:

  • Pat down each separately by secret or covert means
  • Or, throwing himself under the protection of any two immediate kings of considerable power, he may defend himself against an immediate enemy
  • Or, having made an alliance with a chief in a stronghold, he may adopt double policy (i.e., make peace with one of the two kings, and wage war with another)
  • Or, be may adapt himself to circumstances depending upon the causes of peace and war in order
  • Or, he may make friendship with traitors, enemies, and wild chiefs who are conspiring against both the kings
  • Or, pretending to be a close friend of one of them, he may strike the other at the latter’s weak point by employing enemies, and wild tribes
  • Or, having made friendship with both, he may form a Circle of States
  • Or, he may make an alliance with the madhyama or the neutral king; and with this help he may put down one of them or both
  • Or when hurt by both, he may seek protection from a king of righteous character among:
  • the madhyama king
  • the neutral king
  • their friends or equals
  • any other king whose subjects are so disposed as to increase his happiness and peace, with whose help he may be able to recover his lost position, with whom his ancestors were in close intimacy, or blood relationship, and in whose kingdom he can find a number of powerful friends

The near weak fear near strength more than far strength. The near weak fear near hurt more than far hurt.

Near strength fears far strength more than near strengthNear strength fears far hurt more than near hurt.

For the near weak, fear is near. For near strength, fear is far.

For the near weak, hurt is near. For near strength, hurt is far.

The near weak support far strength to keep near strength doing what they must. Near strength opposes far strength to keep the near weak doing what they must.

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