On the felicities of graph-based game-board design – seven

[ by Charles Cameron — the series continues from six ]

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What a pleasure to discover Matt Damon does graph theory in his spare time!

Matt Damon draws graphs

— or that the female face. similarly, is viewed by some as the basis for graphical analysis:

Facial recognition

— and that even war-gaming boards, such as this one from PAXsims’ ISIS Crisis game, can feature the node and edge / circle and line format, along with cards, dice, hexagons…

Geek and Sundry

**

Sources:

  • Matt Damon, Good Will Hunting
  • PBS Digital, The vague Horror of Face-Swap
  • Geek & Sundry, Can Gaming Inporove Strategic Military Planning?
  • Incidentally, I have a brief exchange with Rex Brynen in the comments section at PAXsims
  • Previous posts in this series:

  • On the felicities of graph-based game-board design: preliminaries
  • On the felicities of graph-based game-board design: two dazzlers
  • On the felicities of graph-based game-board design: three
  • On the felicities of graph-based game-board design: four
  • On the felicities of graph-based game-board design: five
  • On the felicities of graph-based game-board design: six
  • 1 comment on this post.
    1. Overload in CO:

      The GMT game, Tigers in the Mist, uses a point to point movement system. It’s a Battle of the Bulge and the reason for the unique movement system is that the lowlands and woods were considered impassible, leaving only road movement. Movement is junction to junction, which could be an intersection or a town.
      Good game too.
      Overload in CO