Sunday surprise: Synchronize watches!

[ by Charles Cameron — from science and religion, two prime resources for scenario planners ]

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Here are two versions of how close we may be to The End of Story. In the upper panel, a glimpse of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists’ Doomsday Dashboard, representing their version of the scientific view:

DQ Doomsday Rapture

In the lower panel, the current state of the Rapture Index, representing the view of a Christian website dedicated to reading the signs and keeping us updated on our proximity to a day that, per scripturam, “knoweth no man, no, not the angels of heaven, but my Father only.”

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Sources:

  • Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Doomsday Dashboard
  • The Rapture Index, updated June 20, 2016
  • Matthew 24.36 (KJV), But of that day and hour knoweth no man
  • Subzin movie quotes, Synchronize watches
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    Who you gonna believe?

    As Tim Furnish might say, BREXIT is not the Apocalypse, not even close — it hasn’t even merited an uptick in the Rapture Index.

    1 comment on this post.
    1. Charles Cameron:

      Gary DeMar is an old-style Theonomist who believes “that the world is not ending tomorrow and that Christ’s Kingdom will be victorious on the earth”.
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      John Hagee is a mega-church pastor and the author of numerous end times vooks, including Beginning of the End: The Assassination of Yitzhak Rabin and the Coming Antichrist (1996), From Daniel to Doomsday: The Countdown Has Begun (2000), and Earth’s Final Moments: Powerful Insight and Understanding of the Prophetic Signs that Surround Us (2011).
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      I received this diagram in an email from DeMar a day or two ago. In it, he uses Brexit, which Hagee’s prophetic writings don’t seem to have been aware of, to critique the “apocalypse very soon” timelines so popular among “prophecy” writers [see Clarence Larkin’s 1920 Dispensational Truth [with Full Size Illustrations], or more recently Tim LaHaye’s 2001 A Visual Guide to Understanding Bible Prophecy:

      DeMar critiques Hagee's use of end-times diagrams

      This ties in with my continuing campaign against the idea that we can usefully plan for the future by extending current trend lines. What I’ve been wanting to see, and thinking & writing about a lot these last few weeks, is a timeline from 2016 to 2035 showing the frequency of “black swans’ of various sizes. Little did I suspect even ten days ago that Brexit would come to pass, nor the wake it will create..