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A second DoubleQuote from the El Paso / Dayton shootings

Monday, August 5th, 2019

[ by Charles Cameron — following on from On the literary transmission of terror: 1: mirroring Twitter-feeds ]
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This one’s a matter of two sisters — onw of whom is a martyr-victim, the other a target-victim:

Giving one’s life to protect one’s kin is an easily understood, deeply honorable affair; getting killed by one’s kin either in vengeance or unintentionally — in haste, with a too-rapid-fire weapon — is saddening and sobering.

May there be less dead sisters, and less dead in mass casualty events, going forward. That’s a prayer.

Romero: conservative, archbishop, radical, martyr, pop saint, Saint

Friday, October 19th, 2018

[ by Charles Cameron — Pope Francis recently canonized him — this is my belated tribute ]
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  • The Economist, El Salvador’s most famous martyr, Óscar Romero, is canonised
  • The Atlantic, What Óscar Romero’s Canonization Says About Pope Francis
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    He was already a popular saint. For years the faithful have congregated every Sunday for mass by his tomb in the crypt of the cathedral in San Salvador, inspired by the man they called San Óscar or San Romero de América. Now it is official. On October 14th in Rome, Archbishop Óscar Arnulfo Romero was canonised, almost 40 years after he fell to a gunman’s bullet while finishing a private mass at a chapel that is today a site of pilgrimage. He had recited the 23rd Psalm: “Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil.”

    As the archbishop read the Gospel, the assassins pulled up to the chapel. As he raised the consecrated bread and wine, the gunman fired a shot to the heart.

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    The Economist’s graphic, above, gets it wrong. It’s not the struggle, signified by the familiar raised, clenched fist that grabs the halo of sanctity, it’s the diminutive (humble) figure in clerical garb, his hands holding a cross and giving a blessing on whom the halo descends, as noted by Pope Francis.

    The theological and political twists and turns of Romero’s life are succinctly presented in my heading, with further details in the two articles.

    What I have wanted to illuminate here, however, is the sacramental nature of the arch bishop’s martyrdom, assassinated while saying Mass. Cavanaugh has an entire, brilliant book, Torture and Eucharist: Theology, Politics, and the Body of Christ demonstrating torture in S America as the inverse of sacrament, the attempt to wipe out all traces of the body of Christ present in those who receive it in the Eucharistic sacrament, and the martyrdom of Romero is a summation and eloquent proof of Cavanaugh’s thesis.

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    As I mentioed here before, in Of sacrifice and martyrdom, I have a particular interest in eucharistic martyrs, ghaving served Mass often enough, kneeling on the paving-stones of the lady chapel of Brightwell church near Wallingford, Berks — or is it now Oxon?

    There in the Lady Chapel, embedded in one of those stones, is the brass of a priest of Brightwell, who too was assassinated while saying Mass.

    The brass might as well be illustrating the holy death of Saint Oscar Romero, archbishop and martyr.

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    Oscar Romero, ora pro nobis.

    Game and other metaphors

    Tuesday, December 19th, 2017

    [ by Charles Cameron — chess, billiards, dominoes and roulette — one horse, but no cats ]
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    I’m always fascinated by chess and other game metaphors, but they’re generally verbal, so this one is a treat:

    That’s from a War on the Rocks / US Institute of Peace piece, Harnessing Iraq’s deadly array of armed groups after ISIL, by Sarhang Hamasaeed — the first in a series.

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    War is the continuation of games by other means. Everyone and her donkey has an “x is the continuation of y by other means” formulation, and they’re mostly a bit lame — this is mine.

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    Some recent game metaphors I’ve caught while my computer has been in the shop:

    Chris Matthews had a rather neat billiards insight: “you always want to place the ball after the shot..

    Somewhere — it’s probably a cliche by now — “the first domino to fall”.

    “Nasser is playing roulette with the stability of the whole world” — in the TV series, Crown. second season, episode 1.

    **

    Okay, non-game metaphors, of particular interest when they’re religious:

    Al Franken was identified as a sacrificial lamb after his fellow Dems turned on him en masse by Kevin Nealon, a metaphor disputed by Stephanie Ruhle.

    Scapegoats, sacrificial lambs amd martyrs are about as heady a set of transcendental metaphors as one might hope for — Franken is in heady conceptual company here.

    And here’s a newly-minted Franken-word:

    There’s a new word which has registered on the media’s radar, and that is “unresign” — or “un-resign,” depending on the news organization.

    Aah, aah.

    Okay, back to religion. Church MilitantSteve Bannon apparently used the phrase at a Vaticaan conference in 2014:

    In his presentation, Mr. Bannon, then the head of the hard-right website Breitbart News and now Mr. Trump’s chief strategist, called on the “church militant” to fight a global war against a “new barbarity” of “Islamic fascism” and international financial elites, with 2,500 years of Western civilization at risk.

    Samuel Freedman commented in the NYT:

    While most listeners probably overlooked the term “church militant,” knowledgeable Catholics would have recognized it as a concept deeply embedded in the church’s teaching. Moreover, they would have noticed that Mr. Bannon had taken the term out of context, invoking it in a call for cultural and military conflict rather than for spiritual warfare, particularly within one’s soul, its longstanding connotation.

    Metaphor? The Church as an army? Salvation Army? Or a direct reference to the Church, factually, actually, Militant?

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    Well-turned phrases:

    “The cost of doing nothing is not nothing.” John Delaney, (D-MD)

    “The Arabs never miss an opportunity to miss an opportunity,” quoted in The Jerusalem Post, November 2002.

    Well, that’s a bit ancient. How about:

    This is what hell looks like: a country where people talk about morals and wave bibles, defending someone who’s accused of pedophilia. .. and what we need is redmption.

    That’s Frank Schaeffer, son of Francis Schaeffer — founder of L’Abri and the conservative right movement — on JoyAM. Fierce.

    And cruel, but decidedly witty — this amazing headline:

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    Then there are the ouroboroi — the self-referential phrasings:

    Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-CA):

    You call it the Trump privilege. I call it the privilege privilege.

    Also: “To spy on the spies.”

    And somewhere: “investigating the investigators..”

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    Mercifully, no cute cats nor kitties.

    Model the emotions

    Tuesday, December 12th, 2017

    [ by Charles Cameron — if you don’t like most poetry, try this ]

    While I’ve been confined to bed, my poetry has been moving towards the topics I write about here on Zenpundit — and here I want to present one such poem, clarifying my view of the importance of emotion:

    Model the emotions, and aha!

    Model the emotions, map them against a globe,
    color here rage, here despair, here
    indifference. Color the subtleties,
    the overlaps, undercurrents.
    Note the sectarian passions,
    pilgrims sweeping towards Karbala
    for Arba’een, for whom
    every day is ‘Ashura and every land is Karbala.

    Color their thirst for martyrdom,
    the sparks of attacking Sunnis,
    get down to the gritty level where you model
    explosions and bullets themselves,
    the broken limbs of children:
    model the emotions, you have the world.

    Pinging Madhu?

    Vladimir Putin and St Vladimir, Church and State in Russia

    Wednesday, August 17th, 2016

    [ by Charles Cameron — Saint Vlad II? Tsar Vlad? Impaler Vlad? Ras(KGB)Putin? — my latest piece, posted today at LapidoMedia ]
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    Here’s the opening of my latest piece for LapidoMedia, exploring issues of Church and State — with an eye on Putin & Patriarch Kirill, and their join interest in the assassination / martydom of the Romanovs.

    Vladimir Putin and St Vladimir, Church and State in Russia

    THE Romanovs, the royal family of the Russian Tsars were killed, and some would say martyred, by the Bolsheviks in 1918.

    But now, almost a century later, President Vladimir Putin, appears to be slowly rehabilitating the royals.

    And the Romanovs’ reemergence has implications for Putin, a quasi-Tsar as Russian head of state, emphasizing renewed collaboration between Church and State, long estranged during Soviet rule.

    Here as in many other ways, Putin works in close association with his fellow ex-KGB hand, Patriarch Kirill II of Moscow. Forbes described him as more than a mere informer saying he was ‘an active officer’ of the spy organization.

    And Putin’s friend the Patriarch too has a keen interest in the rehabilitation of the Romanovs.

    In a 2013 television broadcast on the significance of the Romanov family, he said: ‘A solemn Divine Liturgy was celebrated on March 6 in Dormition Cathedral in the Kremlin, during which we commemorated all Romanovs, beginning with Mikhail Fedorovich, Aleksei Mikhailovich – the great gatherer of the Russian land, Peter I, and down to the Holy Passion-Bearer Nicholas II. We commemorated these people with thanks to God for their efforts and with prayers beseeching the Lord to grant rest to their souls in the abode of the righteous.’

    To read the rest, including the end of my tale, looking at ideas that Vladimir Putin must surely have entertained– Saint Vladimir II? Tsar Vlad? Impaler Vlad? Ras(KGB)Putin? — please go to the Lapido site.

    Enjoy.


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